Community and Public Health Nursing: Evidence for Practice 2nd edition Harkness, DeMarco Test Bank

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  • Published: 2015
  • ISBN-10: 1451191316
  • ISBN-13: 978-1451191318

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community and public health nursing evidence for practice 2nd edition test bank

Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing
1.The occupational and environmental health nurse faces many different practice issues every day and can function comfortably in roles as a clinician, coordinator, and case manager following company procedures, using assessment checklists and clinical protocols to provide treatment. At which American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN) competency level in occupational and environmental health nursing is this nurse functioning?
A)Advanced beginner
B)Competent
C)Proficient
D)Expert
Ans:B
Feedback:
Benner identified five stages of competency in clinical nursing practice: novice, advanced beginner, competent, proficient, and expert. Within each stage are levels of achievement that are expressed in measurable behavioral objectives. AAOHN has cross-referenced and stated behavioral objectives for the OHN in three of these stages: competent, proficient, and expert. The competent nurse is one who is confident and a master, with an ability to cope with specific situations. There is less of a need to rely on the judgment of peers and other professionals. The proficient nurse is one with the ability to perceive client situations on the basis of past experiences, with a focus on relevant aspects of the situation. The nurse is able to predict expected events in certain situations and recognize that protocols must be altered at times to meet the needs of the client. The expert nurse is one who has extensive experience with a broad knowledge base that enables the nurse to grasp a situation quickly and initiate action. The nurse has a sense of salience grounded in practice guiding actions and priorities.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 2
2.The occupational and environmental health nurse provides leadership in developing occupational safety and health policy within the organization and function in an upper management role. The nurse has served as a consultant to both business and government and has designed and conducted significant research. At which American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN) competency level in occupational and environmental health nursing is this nurse functioning?
A)Advanced beginner
B)Competent
C)Proficient
D)Expert
Ans:D
Feedback:
Benner identified five stages of competency in clinical nursing practice: novice, advanced beginner, competent, proficient, and expert. Within each stage are levels of achievement that are expressed in measurable behavioral objectives. AAOHN has cross-referenced and stated behavioral objectives for the OHN in three of these stages: competent, proficient, and expert. The competent nurse is one who is confident and a master, with an ability to cope with specific situations. There is less of a need to rely on the judgment of peers and other professionals. The proficient nurse is one with the ability to perceive client situations on the basis of past experiences, with a focus on relevant aspects of the situation. The nurse is able to predict expected events in certain situations and recognize that protocols must be altered at times to meet the needs of the client. The expert nurse is one who has extensive experience with a broad knowledge base that enables the nurse to grasp a situation quickly and initiate action. The nurse has a sense of salience grounded in practice guiding actions and priorities.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 3
3.The occupational and environmental health nurse quickly obtains the information needed for accurate assessment and zoom in on the critical aspects of a problem in response to a client situation. The nurse uses highly developed clinical and managerial skills in the work environment. At which American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN) competency level in occupational and environmental health nursing is this nurse functioning?
A)Advanced beginner
B)Competent
C)Proficient
D)Expert
Ans:C
Feedback:
Benner identified five stages of competency in clinical nursing practice: novice, advanced beginner, competent, proficient, and expert. Within each stage are levels of achievement that are expressed in measurable behavioral objectives. AAOHN has cross-referenced and stated behavioral objectives for the OHN in three of these stages: competent, proficient, and expert. The competent nurse is one who is confident and a master, with an ability to cope with specific situations. There is less of a need to rely on the judgment of peers and other professionals. The proficient nurse is one with the ability to perceive client situations on the basis of past experiences, with a focus on relevant aspects of the situation. The nurse is able to predict expected events in certain situations and recognize that protocols must be altered at times to meet the needs of the client. The expert nurse is one who has extensive experience with a broad knowledge base that enables the nurse to grasp a situation quickly and initiate action. The nurse has a sense of salience grounded in practice guiding actions and priorities.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 4
4.Which exemplifies a physical hazard?
A)Infectious agents
B)Hazardous drug and toxin exposures
C)Electric and magnetic fields
D)Sexual harassment
Ans:C
Feedback:
Electric and magnetic fields are an example of a physical hazard. Infectious agents are an example of a biological hazard. Hazardous drug and toxin exposures are an example of a chemical exposure. Sexual harassment is an example of a psychosocial factor.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 5
5.Which exemplify biological hazards? (Select all that apply.)
A)Contaminated body fluids
B)Poisonous plants
C)Diesel exhaust
D)Venomous snakes
E)Aerosols
Ans:A, B, D
Feedback:
Contaminated body fluids, poisonous plants, and venomous snakes are examples of biological hazards. Diesel exhaust and aerosols are examples of chemical exposure.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 6
6.According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, how many workers in all industries, including state and local governments, had a reportable injury or illness in 2011?
A)3.8 of 100
B)4.2 of 100
C)5.8 of 100
D)6.2 of 100
Ans:A
Feedback:
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that 3.8 of 100 workers in all industries, including state and local governments, had a reportable injury or illness in 2011.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 7
7.A line operator in a manufacturing facility comes in to the on-site clinic reporting numbness in his hands after excessive exposure to the toxin benzene. Applying the epidemiologic triad to this scenario, which is the host?
A)Line operator
B)Manufacturing facility
C)Benzene
D)Hands
Ans:A
Feedback:
The epidemiologic triad is very helpful in occupational health nursing practice as a means to understand the complex relationships among the workers, hazards in the workplace, and hazards in the environment. In the epidemiologic triad, each worker is a host within the work population. The agents in the epidemiologic triad are workplace hazards classified as biological, chemical, physical, or psychosocial agents. The workplace exists within an external environment with specific geological and atmospheric characteristics, air and water quality, and presence or absence of environmental pollution.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 8
8.Which injury has the highest incidence rate among occupational injuries and illnesses that result in days away from work?
A)Sprains
B)Broken bones
C)Cuts
D)Carpal tunnel syndrome
Ans:A
Feedback:
The highest incidence rate resulting in days away from work occurred from sprains, strains, and tears. Cuts were in second place, fractures in fourth place, and carpal tunnel syndrome in seventh place.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 9
9.Which industry has the highest number of fatal injuries?
A)Agriculture
B)Construction
C)Mining
D)Transportation
Ans:D
Feedback:
The number of fatal injuries related to transportation is the highest.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 10
10.A newly hired health and safety officer works for a large manufacturing facility. One of the officer’s first jobs is to conduct a complete survey of the workplace to determine what hazards are present, the location of entries and exits, the availability of emergency equipment, and potential trouble spots. Which interventions should the officer implement to accomplish this goal?
A)Ergonomics
B)Occupational health history
C)Root cause analysis
D)Workplace walk-through
Ans:D
Feedback:
A workplace walk-through is a complete survey of the workplace, inside and outside, compiling information as to the presence of hazards, the location of entries and exits, the availability of emergency equipment, and potential trouble spots. Ergonomics is the study of the relationship between people and their working environment. Occupational health history is an assessment of the characteristics of the workers’ present jobs, a chronological record of all past work and potential exposures, an occupational exposure inventory, and a list of other exposures in the home or community. Root cause analysis is a process for understanding and solving a problem, with the goal of determining what happened, why it happened, and what can be done to prevent its reoccurrence.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 11
11.The occupational health nurse for an electronics factory compiles an occupational health history for each worker. Which should be included? (Select all that apply.)
A)Location of facility exits and entries
B)Chronological record of all past work and potential exposures
C)An occupational exposure inventory
D)List of exposures in the home or community
E)Availability of emergency equipment
Ans:B, C, D
Feedback:
Components of the occupational health history include characteristics of the workers’ present jobs, a chronological record of all past work and potential exposures, an occupational exposure inventory, and a list of other exposures in the home or community. The location of facility exits and entries and the availability of emergency equipment are aspects of a workplace walk-through.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 12
12.The occupational health nurse for a hydroelectric plant uses root cause analysis to investigate a recent accidental electrocution of a plant worker. The nurse currently is defining the characteristics of the case. In which step of the root cause analysis is the nurse?
A)Define the problem
B)Collect data
C)Identify possible causal factors
D)Identify the root cause
Ans:A
Feedback:
Defining the problem includes defining the characteristics of the case and determining the circumstances under which it occurred. Collecting data includes determining whether similar illnesses or injuries occurred in the past, comparing similarities and differences, creating a time line related to the problem, and determining the impact of the problem. Identifying possible causal factors includes convening people involved in the situation to discuss the cause, determining the sequence of events that led to the illness or injury, identifying the conditions that allowed the problem to occur, identifying related problems, creating a chart of possible causal factors, and identifying causal factors and possible interrelationships. Identifying the root cause includes identifying the true causes of the illness or injury, determining why the causal factor or factors exist, and determining the real reason the problem occurred.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 13
13.A newly hired health promotion specialist works at a meat-processing facility. The specialist is in charge of developing a program that encourages a balance among work, family, personal, health, and psychosocial concerns. Which components are appropriate to include in this program? (Select all that apply.)
A)Signage that demonstrates safe lifting techniques
B)Free screening for HIV
C)Diagnosis of potentially malignant skin lesions
D)Clinic on proper use of safety goggles and other equipment
E)Monitoring of noise levels within the facility
Ans:A, D, E
Feedback:
Educating all employees and administrative staff regarding the exposures and hazards associated with the workplace is the foundation of health-promotion efforts, such as signage that demonstrates safe lifting techniques. A common health and safety promotion program in occupational settings involves preservation of sight and hearing, such as use of safety goggles and monitoring of noise levels. Screening for HIV and diagnosis of skin lesions would go beyond the scope of health promotion and would involve clinical diagnosis.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 14
14.The occupational health nurse for a computer manufacturer is required to conduct a physical examination of each new hire. The rationale for this action is to:
A)Screen for cardiac defects the worker may be unaware of.
B)Ensure the worker’s fitness for the job.
C)Determine possible causes of the worker’s chief complaint.
D)Provide a baseline for future comparison.
E)Determine the worker’s eligibility for the company health insurance plan.
Ans:B
Feedback:
A health record can be kept on the employees as part of their other employment records. This process often starts with an initial physical examination appropriate to the type of work that is going to be done. The physical examination helps ensure fitness for the job and provides a baseline for future comparison. The physical examination is not performed to screen for cardiac defects, determine possible causes of a chief complaint, or determine a worker’s eligibility for the company health insurance plan.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 15
15.The occupational health nurse with a construction company is responsible for filling out a record of accidents and illnesses that occur on the company’s work sites. Which source should the nurse consult to acquire the proper record-keeping form and guidelines?
A)FMLA
B)OSHA
C)HIPAA
D)NORA
Ans:B
Feedback:
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) designs and distributes record-keeping forms called the OSHA log. The Occupational health nurse is usually responsible for filling out the OSHA log. This injury log is a record of accidents and illnesses that occur within a given year at every workplace facility employing 10 or more people. According to the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), in the case of serious illness affecting themselves or family members, when all conditions are met under this act, employees can leave work for up to 12 weeks and return to work without penalty. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) mandates that all medical information be held in confidence. One way to ensure privacy is to keep all health-related information in a separate, secured file and storage area other than the business or human resource files. The National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) is a partnership program to stimulate innovative research and improved practices for safer, healthier workplaces.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 16
16.Which data are tracked under epidemiologic workplace surveillance? (Select all that apply.)
A)Injuries
B)Illness
C)Hazards
D)Exposures
E)Productivity
Ans:A, B, C, D
Feedback:
Workplace health surveillance includes physical examinations and the tracking of injuries, illness, hazards, and exposures both in individual people and for groups of workers. Productivity would not be tracked under epidemiologic workplace surveillance.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 17
17.The occupational health nurse at a company has seen three different employees in one week who have all reported similar upper respiratory symptoms. Which rate should the nurse consider calculating to understand the severity of this problem and to determine whether a cluster or cohort is forming?
A)Productivity rate
B)Incidence rate
C)Prevalence rate
D)Ratio of affected to unaffected
Ans:B
Feedback:
If there happens to be more than one worker from the same department with consistent symptoms and objective findings, the OHN may immediately begin to suspect that a cluster or cohort is forming and should determine the number of new cases of the condition, or the incidence rate. Clusters are aggregations of disease diagnoses collected from a specific population within a distinct period of time or space. The calculation of incidence rates is a helpful tool in understanding the severity of a workplace problem. Prevalence reflects the total burden of the injury or illness that exists in the population—in this case, the workplace. It includes both new cases and existing cases, as opposed to the incidence rate, which only includes new cases. Ratios can compare and involve groups of workers in settings. This approach adds clarity when comparing the number of affected workers in an organization that employs workers located in various geographic locations.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 18
18.The occupational health nurse for a multinational corporation compares aggregate data on the occurrence of lung cancer in workers in a factory in Brazil with workers in a factory in Hong Kong. Which type of epidemiologic study is this nurse most likely conducting?
A)Prospective, cohort
B)Case-control
C)Ecological
D)Cohort case-control
Ans:C
Feedback:
Ecological studies are types of epidemiologic studies that compare the rates of exposures and diseases in different populations, such as in the two groups of factory workers in different countries. Prospective, cohort epidemiologic studies investigate workers who have been exposed to a variety of chemical, biological, or physical agents. The purpose of these follow-up studies is to determine whether the risk of adverse health outcomes after the event is increased. Epidemiologic studies may involve the evaluation of workers who have already experienced a common adverse health outcome. In this case, the outcome has already occurred, so the purpose of these case-control studies is to investigate, retrospectively, what agent or set of agents may explain their condition. There is no cohort case-control study.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 19
19.The occupational health nurse is a member of the emergency planning committee in the workplace. The nurse is helping to formulate an emergency plan for the facility. Which goals should the nurse keep in mind while developing the plan? (Select all that apply.)
A)Establish clear reporting instructions for employees.
B)Provide instructions on safe lifting techniques.
C)Identify hazardous substances that workers are exposed to in their daily work.
D)Name key personnel who will assume necessary tasks.
E)Establish emergency escape routes.
Ans:A, D, E
Feedback:
The goals of an emergency plan are to anticipate emergencies and to establish clear reporting instructions for employees. The plan names key personnel who will assume necessary tasks. It establishes emergency escape routes and procedures to identify workers and visitors with and without disabilities. The plan ensures that predesignated areas have been arranged and employees have participated in actual drills. An emergency plan would not include providing instructions on safe lifting techniques or identifying hazardous substances, as these are normal work concerns, not emergencies.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 20
20.The occupational health nurse is a member of the emergency planning committee in the workplace. The nurse is helping to formulate an emergency plan for the facility. Which key components should the nurse include in the emergency plan? (Select all that apply.)
A)Alarms
B)Phones
C)Reporting
D)Communication
E)Evacuation
Ans:A, C, D, E
Feedback:
Key components of the emergency plan involve alarms, reporting, communication, evacuation, a system for counting the occupants, procedures for staff who do not immediately evacuate, and rescue and medical services. Phones would not be a component of the plan.
Origin:  Chapter 25- Occupational Health Nursing, 21
21.The occupational health nurse works in facility located in a region that is highly prone to tornadoes. Which intervention should the nurse make sure is included in the facility’s emergency plan to address this potential threat?
A)A shelter-in-place policy and procedure
B)Personal protective equipment
C)Evacuation drills
D)Decontamination procedures
Ans:A
Feedback:
A shelter-in-place policy and procedure must be established for emergencies such as hurricanes, tornadoes, high winds, or chemical releases in buildings such as healthcare and correctional facilities. Personal protective equipment and decontamination procedures are needed for those who work with and around hazardous materials and chemicals but would not be needed for a tornado. During a tornado, workers should shelter in place, not evacuate the building.

community and public health nursing evidence for practice 2nd edition test bank

  • community and public health nursing: evidence for practice 2nd edition pdf
  • community and public health nursing evidence for practice pdf
  • community and public health nursing evidence for practice second edition test bank

Table of Contents = 25 Chapters

PART 1
The Context of Public
Health Nursing 1
CHAPTER 1
Public Health Nursing: Present,
Past, and Future 3
Healthcare Changes in the
Twenty-First Century 4
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING TODAY 9
Roots of Public Health Nursing 12
CHALLENGES FOR PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING
IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY 19
CHAPTER 2
Public Health Systems 26
IMPORTANCE OF UNDERSTANDING HOW PUBLIC HEALTH
SYSTEMS ARE ORGANIZED 27
STRUCTURE OF PUBLIC HEALTHCARE IN THE
UNITED STATES 27
FUNCTIONS OF PUBLIC HEALTH IN THE
UNITED STATES 30
TRENDS IN PUBLIC HEALTH IN THE UNITED STATES 32
HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS IN SELECTED DEVELOPED
NATIONS 34
PUBLIC HEALTH COMMITMENTS TO THE WORLD:
INTERNATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH AND DEVELOPING
COUNTRIES 40
CHAPTER 3
Health Policy, Politics, and Reform 46
HEALTHCARE POLICY AND THE POLITICAL PROCESS 47
HEALTHCARE FINANCES AND COST–BENEFIT 50
ACCESS TO CARE AND HEALTH INSURANCE 51
HEALTHCARE WORKFORCE DIVERSITY 52
NURSING’S ROLE IN SHAPING HEALTHCARE POLICY 53
QUALITY OF CARE 54
INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 55
EQUITY IN HEALTHCARE ACCESS AND QUALITY 55
ETHICAL CONSIDERATION 56
HEALTH ADVOCACY AND HEALTHCARE REFORM 57
HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH 58
CONCLUSION 58
Evidence-Based Practice and
Population Health 81
CHAPTER 4
Health and the Global Environment 62
DEFINITIONS OF HEALTH 63
CRITICAL GLOBAL HEALTH CONCEPTS 64
THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS 71
OTHER FACTORS THAT AFFECT GLOBAL HEALTH 74
ROLE OF NURSES 77CHAPTER 5
Frameworks for Health Promotion, Disease
Prevention, and Risk Reduction 83
HEALTH PROMOTION, DISEASE PREVENTION,
AND RISK REDUCTION AS CORE ACTIVITIES
OF PUBLIC HEALTH 85
HEALTHY PEOPLE INITIATIVES 86
ROAD MAPS TO HEALTH PROMOTION 87
BEHAVIOR MODELS 92
USE OF THE ECOLOGIC MODEL: EVIDENCE FOR HEALTH
PROMOTION INTERVENTION 98
HEALTH PROMOTION AND SECONDARY/
TERTIARY PREVENTION FOR WOMEN LIVING
WITH HIV/AIDS 100
ROLE OF NURSES 100
CHAPTER 6
Epidemiology: The Science of Prevention 105
Defining Epidemiology 107
Development of Epidemiology as a Science 108
Epidemiologic Models 110
Applying Epidemiologic Principles in Practice 113
CHAPTER 7
Describing Health Conditions: Understanding
and Using Rates 121
Understanding and Using Rates 123
Specific Rates : Describing by Person, Place,
and Time 127
Types of Incidence Rates 133
Sensitivity and Specificity 134
Use of Rates in Descriptive Research Studies 135
one
CHAPTER 8
Gathering Evidence for Public
Health Practice 137
OBSERVATIONAL STUDIES 139
INTERVENTION (EXPERIMENTAL) STUDIES 144
Implementing Nursing Practice
in Community Settings 149
CHAPTER 9
Planning for Community Change 151
HEALTH PLANNING 152
COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT 154
SYSTEMS THEORY 155
WORKING WITH THE COMMUNITY 155
SOCIAL ECOLOGIC MODEL 157
HEALTH IMPACT PYRAMID 157
MULTILEVEL INTERVENTIONS 158
SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH 159
CHANGE THEORY 161
PLANNING COMMUNITY-LEVEL INTERVENTIONS 164
COLLABORATION AND TEAMWORK 166
EVALUATING COMMUNITY-LEVEL INTERVENTIONS 167
FUNDING COMMUNITY-LEVEL INTERVENTION
PROGRAMS 168
SOCIAL MARKETING 170
NURSE-MANAGED HEALTH CENTERS 170
CHAPTER 10
Cultural Diversity and Values 174
Culture and Nursing 175
Western Biomedicine as “Cultured ” 180
Aspects of Culture Directly Affecting Health
and Health Care 180
Cultural Health Assessment 184
CHAPTER 11
Community Assessment 187
Defining the Community and its Boundaries 189
Frameworks for Community Assessment 192
CHAPTER 12
Care Management, Case Management,
and Home Healthcare 204
Care Management 205
Case Management 206
Home Healthcare 207
CASE MANAGEMENT, HOME HEALTHCARE, AND CURRENT
HEALTHCARE REFORM 221
three P A R T
Challenges in Community
and Public Health Nursing 249
CHAPTER 13
Family Assessment 225
FAMILIES IN COMMUNITIES 226
NURSING PERSPECTIVES ON THE FAMILY AND
APPLICATIONS FOR ASSESSMENT 228
DIVERSITY AND FAMILY 234
FAMILIES AND HEALTH RISK 237
COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSES’ RESPONSIBILITY
TO FAMILIES 244
CHAPTER 14
Risk of Infectious and Communicable
Diseases 251
EPIDEMIOLOGY OF THE INFECTIOUS PROCESS: THE CHAIN
OF INFECTION 255
OUTBREAK INVESTIGATION 258
HEALTHCARE-ASSOCIATED INFECTIONS 260
PUBLIC HEALTH SURVEILLANCE 261
SPECIFIC COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 262
PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF SPECIFIC INFECTIOUS
DISEASES 276
CHAPTER 15
Emerging Infectious Diseases 281
Factors that Influence Emerging Infectious
Diseases 282
RECENT EMERGING AND REEMERGING INFECTIOUS
DISEASES 287
CONCLUSIONS 303
CHAPTER 16
Violence and Abuse 307
OVERVIEW OF VIOLENCE 308
INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE 311
MANDATORY REPORTING OF ABUSE 317
INTERVENTION 319
MODEL OF CARE FOR VICTIMS OF INTENTIONAL
CRIMES 320
FORENSIC NURSING 320
CHAPTER 17
Substance Use 325
INTERNATIONAL ASPECTS OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE 326
HEALTH PROFILES AND INTERVENTIONS FOR -HIGH-RISK
POPULATIONS 331
Impact on the Community 343
PUBLIC HEALTH MODELS FOR POPULATIONS AT RISK 343
TREATMENT INTERVENTIONS FOR SUBSTANCE
ABUSE 348
Goals of Healthy People 2010 351
CHAPTER 18
Underserved Populations 357
THE CONTEXT OF HEALTH RISKS 358
RURAL POPULATIONS 360
CORRECTIONAL HEALTH: UNDERSERVED POPULATIONS
IN JAILS AND PRISONS 367
GAY, LESBIAN, BISEXUAL, AND TRANSGENDER
PEOPLE 371
HOMELESS POPULATIONS 373
CHAPTER 19
Environmental Health 378
HUMAN HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT 379
ASSESSMENT 382
INTERVENTIONS 395
EVALUATION 397
ENVIRONMENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY 397
WORKING TOWARD HEALTHY ENVIRONMENTS 399
CHILDREN’S HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT 399
ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE 401
GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH CHALLENGES 401
CHAPTER 20
Community Preparedness: Disaster
and Terrorism 405
EMERGENCIES, DISASTERS, AND TERRORISM 407
DISASTER PREPAREDNESS IN A CULTURALLY
DIVERSE SOCIETY 409
DISASTER MANAGEMENT 410
ROLES OF NURSES IN DISASTER MANAGEMENT 414
BIOTERRORISM 419
CHEMICAL DISASTERS 425
RADIOLOGIC DISASTERS 429
BLAST INJURIES 430
PUBLIC HEALTH DISASTER RESPONSE 431
Specialty Practice 437
CHAPTER 21
Community Mental Health 439
CULTURAL CONTEXT OF MENTAL ILLNESS 440
DEFINITIONS OF MENTAL ILLNESS 441
SCOPE OF MENTAL ILLNESS 441
SOME MAJOR MENTAL ILLNESSES 442
EVOLUTION OF COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH 458
LEGISLATION FOR PARITY IN MENTAL HEALTH
INSURANCE BENEFITS 459
ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE COMMUNITY
MENTAL HEALTH PRACTITIONER 460
PSYCHOLOGICAL FIRST AID 461
CHAPTER 22
School Health 469
Historical Perspectives 470
Role of the School Nurse 471
Common Health Concerns 475
The School Nurse as a Child Advocate 482
The Future of School Health : The Community
School Model 483
CHAPTER 23
Faith-Oriented Communities and Health Ministries
in Faith Communities 486
Nursing in Faith Communities 487
History of Faith Community Nursing 488
Models of Faith Community Practice 488
The Uniqueness of Faith Communities 489
Roles of the Faith Community Nurse 492
Healthy People 2020 Priorities 492
Scope and Standards of Practice 493
The Nursing Process in Faith Community
Nursing 494
Ethical Considerations 497
Education for Faith Community Nursing 498
CHAPTER 24
Palliative and End-of-Life Care 501
Nursing and Patients with Chronic Disease 502
Death in the United States 505
Nursing Care When Death is Imminent 507
Palliative Care 511
Hospice Care 511
Caring for Patients at the End of Life 512
Nursing Care of Patients Who Are Close
to Death 520
Complementar y and Alternative Therapies 522
CHAPTER 25
Occupational Health Nursing 525
The Worker and the Workplace 526
Occupational Health Nursing 530
Conceptual Frameworks 532
Occupational Health Nursing: Practice 535
Implementing Health Promotion in the
Workplace 540
Implementing a Program: Example, Smoking
Cessation 541
Epidemiology and Occupational Health 542
Emergency Preparedness Planning
and Disaster Management 544