Fundamentals of Nursing Care: Concepts, Connections & Skills 2nd edition Burton, Ludwig Test Bank

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  • Published: 2014
  • ISBN-10: 0803639740
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803639744

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fundamentals of nursing care 2nd edition burton test bank

Chapter 3. Nursing Ethics and the Law

Multiple Choice

Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.

____ 1. After providing a.m. care for his patient, a nurse forgot to put the bed in the lowest position and left one of the bed rails down. The patient got out of bed and fell. The nurse could be reported to the board of nursing for

1. Assault.
2. Battery.
3. Negligence.
4. Libel.

____ 2. A nurse has been reported to the board of nursing for performing skills that are outside her scope of practice. The nurse should expect

1. A lawsuit by the institution for malpractice.
2. A hearing by the board of nursing to determine whether the charges are true.
3. Immediate revocation of her nursing license.
4. Requirement to complete a minimum of 10 continuing education units (CEUs).

____ 3. A nurse witnesses a coworker taking a medication ordered for a patient. The nurse’s first course of action is to

1. Ask the other nurses on the unit what they would do.
2. Tell the coworker that the incident will be reported the next time it happens.
3. Offer to care for the nurse’s patients until the medication is no longer effective.
4. Report the incident to the nurse supervisor.

____ 4. A 17-year-old patient injured during a football game is in the emergency department. Before treatment, it is the responsibility of the nurse to

1. Have the step-parent sign the informed consent.
2. Have the patient sign the informed consent.
3. Obtain the custodial parent’s signature on the informed consent.
4. Solicit the signature of the noncustodial parent on the informed consent.

____ 5. A mentally competent patient with a terminal illness refuses to take his medications, stating, “I don’t want to live like this.” The nurse will

1. Ask the physician to change the patient’s medications so they can be given intravenously.
2. Speak to the patient’s family about his refusal of medications so they can discuss it with him.
3. Report the patient’s decision to the physician and continue to provide appropriate compassionate care.
4. Explain to the patient the unwise nature of his decision and the effect that it will have on his family.

____ 6. A nurse feels that his patient needs to be placed in a protective-restraint device to protect him from injury. To place a patient in restraints,

1. The patient must give his or her consent for restraints to be used.
2. A family member must give his or her consent to use restraints.
3. The nurse must have documentation that other methods have been used and failed to protect the patient.
4. The patient must be alert and oriented.

____ 7. A nurse explains to a patient that an instructional directive means

1. A family member has been appointed as having power of attorney.
2. A patient’s wishes must be followed in the event of a major illness.
3. There is a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order for emergency personnel.
4. There are written guidelines specifying care desired and under what circumstances.

____ 8. A patient requests that a nurse copy his chart for his daughter. The nurse replies:

1. “I’ll get a copy made right away. How many copies do you need?”
2. “Only your lawyer can request a copy, so you need to contact her.”
3. “The chart belongs to the hospital, but if you give written permission, a copy can be made for you.”
4. “The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, or HIPAA, prevents the hospital from copying your chart, but you could speak to your physician about it.”

____ 9. A nurse explains to coworkers that care provided for a patient is based on the Nurse Practice Act (NPA), which covers the

1. Patient’s Bill of Rights.
2. Rules and regulations that nurses must practice.
3. American Nurses Association’s (ANA) guidelines.
4. Reasons that nurses may have action taken against their licenses.

____ 10. A patient has refused to take the medications brought in by a nurse. The nurse will chart,

1. “Instructed patient that the medications will be taken now or later.”
2. “Explained to patient that unless medications are taken, the physician will likely issue a discharge.”
3. “Medications refused; physician notified.”
4. “Physician notified that patient is uncooperative.”

____ 11. Following a discussion with a patient about treatment options given by the primary care physician, a nurse assures the patient that the physician will support whatever decision is made. This nurse is acting as the patient’s

1. Ethics board
2. Value system
3. Advocate
4. Conscience

____ 12. Aware that continuing education is a must in providing a high standard of patient care, a nurse will enhance her practice by

1. Taking a cooking class.
2. Becoming computer literate.
3. Studying the history of nursing.
4. Using research to improve practice.

____ 13. A nursing instructor is discussing the importance of a nurse’s responsibility to serve as a patient’s advocate. The instructor recognizes that additional explanation is warranted when a student nurse says:

1. “As a patient’s advocate, I must assert myself in the patient’s best interest.”
2. “As a patient’s advocate, I must subjectively examine the patient’s values.”
3. “As a patient’s advocate, I must provide my patients with care and comfort.”
4. “As a patient’s advocate, I must develop empathy for my patients and their families.”

____ 14. In certain situations when a patient is in the terminal stages of a disease and not expected to live much longer, a physician may be authorized to write a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order in the patient’s chart that limits life-extending measures to

1. Tube feeding.
2. Use of a ventilator.
3. Comfort and dignity.
4. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

____ 15. A nursing instructor explains that a good nurse must make certain that the professional nurse–patient relationship boundaries are never crossed. The instructor realizes that additional clarification is needed when a student nurse says:

1. “I must be careful to never get emotionally involved with my patients.”
2. “I should avoid serving as the patient’s advocate.”
3. “I should never become physically involved with a patient.”
4. “It is unethical to accept gifts or tips from a patient.”

____ 16. A student nurse was discussing the confidentiality of a patient’s medical records. The student’s comments demonstrated a clear understanding of the subject until he or she said:

1. “The patient has the right to request a copy of her chart.”
2. “A patient’s chart is considered confidential and may only be accessed by health-care workers providing care to the patient.”
3. “The chart does not belong to the patient, but is the property of the hospital or of the physician in a clinic setting.”
4. “Under no circumstances should a copy of a patient’s chart be given to the patient’s insurance company.”

____ 17. A nursing student wants to use some information from an actual patient’s chart to prepare a student care plan for class. The student must understand that any data collected from a patient’s chart should

1. Include the patient’s name and any identifying numbers.
2. Be written in a way that it maintains confidentiality for the patient.
3. Be photocopied before being taken outside the hospital walls.
4. Be shredded after the assignment is graded.

____ 18. A student nurse was discussing the subject of incident reports. All of the statements made by the student were accurate until she said:

1. “Incident reports are to be completed in the event of an unusual occurrence or an accident.”
2. “An incident report should be completed according to agency policy, including notification of the supervisor and designated personnel.”
3. “A copy of the incident report should be filed as part of the involved patient’s chart.”
4. “An incident report should include what happened, who was involved, witnesses to the event, and treatment provided.”

Multiple Response

Identify one or more choices that best complete the statement or answer the question.

____ 1. The potential exists for a complaint of sexual harassment if a nurse states which of the following? Select all that apply.

1. “Would you please help me with one of my female patients? She is uncomfortable asking me to assist her to the restroom.”
2. “If I take your patient in Room 203 her pain medication, what are you going to do for me?”
3. “When my patient’s physician arrives on the floor, let me know. I would like to make rounds with him.”
4. “Could you help me with my patient? She’s very large and difficult to get up.”
5. “Male nurses never carry their weight. I think they use the fact that a female patient won’t let them catheterize them as an excuse so they don’t have to put in a Foley catheter.”

____ 2. In some situations, a nurse is required by law to report findings from nurse–patient interactions or the nurse’s assessment. The nurse will notify the proper authorities when which of the following occurs? Select all that apply.

1. A patient admits that her husband frequently hits her and she has broken several bones.
2. An elderly patient tells the nurse that she is afraid of her grandson.
3. There are multiple bruises of varying colors on the back and abdomen of a 9-year-old.
4. An adolescent has a black eye.
5. A patient refuses to answer the nurse’s question because his or her son will be mad.

Completion

Complete each statement.

1.A nurse manager discusses with staff that tort law may be applicable in certain patient situations. The five areas of tort law that apply to nurses are negligence, malpractice, assault and battery, false imprisonment, and ____________________.

2.The ability to intellectually or emotionally understand the feelings of another person without actually experiencing or even agreeing with the person’s situation, thoughts, feelings, distress, or pain is known as ____________________.

3.Inappropriate use of ____________________ devices, including bed rails, chemical restraints such as sedatives and tranquilizers, belts, tied sheets, wrist or ankle restraints, and vest or halter restraints, can be considered false imprisonment.

4.All 50 states have ____________________ laws that require that a nurse report to authorities even suspected child abuse, including physical, verbal, sexual, and emotional abuse, and abuse by neglect.

5.As a nurse or as a student, discussion of patients on social media, even if the patients are unnamed, can cause action to be taken on one’s nursing license if it violates the state’s ____________________ and Rules.

Chapter 3. Nursing Ethics and the Law

Answer Section

MULTIPLE CHOICE

1.ANS:3

Objective: 10. Name five areas of tort law that apply to the nurse.

15. Apply nursing ethics and laws to specific scenarios.

Page: 34-39

Heading: Law > Types of Laws

Integrated Processes: Clinical Problem-Solving Process (Nursing Process)

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Safety and Infection Control

Cognitive Level: Application [Applying]

Concept: Regulations: Legal: Safety

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 Assault is a threat to a person.
2 Battery is touching the patient or performing a treatment without the patient’s permission.
3 Leaving the bed in the lowest position and raising the bed rails are common standards of practice. Failure to take those actions is negligence.
4 An example of libel is a written statement that is untrue.

PTS: 1 CON: Regulations| Legal| Safety

2.ANS:2

Objective: 11. Discuss your responsibilities related to professional accountability.

15. Apply nursing ethics and laws to specific scenarios.

Page: 39-40

Heading: Professional Accountability

Integrated Processes: Communication and Documentation

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Analysis [Analyzing]

Concept: Communication: Regulations: Legal

Difficulty: Moderate

Feedback
1 The institution may terminate a nurse’s employment, but it is improbable that the institution will file a lawsuit.
2 Most likely, a hearing will be conducted by the board of nursing to determine whether the charges reported are true.
3 The nurse may have her license suspended, but the first course of action will be a hearing by the board of nursing to determine whether the charges are true.
4 Some boards of nursing may require CEUs or refresher courses, but that will not be the first course of action.

PTS:1CON:Communication| Regulations| Legal

3.ANS:4

Objective: 5. Identify at least six types of unethical behavior that as a nurse you must report.

Page: 43-45

Heading: Legal Documents > Incident Reports

Integrated Processes: Clinical Problem-Solving Process (Nursing Process)

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Analysis [Analyzing]

Concept: Medication: Communication: Ethics: Legal

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 A nurse should never discuss the situation with coworkers.
2 It is the nurse’s responsibility to report the situation immediately.
3 Offering to provide care for the nurse’s patients temporarily and not reporting the incident immediately is an inappropriate action.
4 The nurse is to report the coworker’s behavior to the nurse supervisor immediately.

PTS:1CON:Medication| Communication| Ethics| Legal

4.ANS:3

Objective: 15. Apply nursing ethics and laws to specific scenarios.

Page: 42-43

Heading: Legal Documents > Informed Consent

Integrated Processes: Communication and Documentation

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Application [Applying]

Concept: Communication: Legal

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 In most states, the step-parent does not have the legal authority to sign an informed consent.
2 An informed consent must be signed by someone 18 years or older unless he or she has been declared an emancipated minor.
3 Informed consent for a minor must be obtained from the parent with custody.
4 In most states, the custodial parent, not the noncustodial parent, must sign the informed consent.

PTS: 1 CON: Communication| Legal

5.ANS:3

Objective: 4. Discuss Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders.

15. Apply nursing ethics and laws to specific scenarios.

Page: 33-34

Heading: Ethics > Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders

Integrated Processes: Clinical Problem-Solving Process (Nursing Process)

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Analysis [Analyzing]

Concept: Medication: Ethics: Legal

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 Forcing medications on a patient is a violation of the patient’s rights. It could also constitute assault and/or battery charges.
2 Discussing the patient with his family without his permission violates the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.
3 It is important to notify the physician of the patient’s decision and recognize the patient’s right to discontinue his medications.
4 It is the patient’s right to refuse any form of treatment. The nurse can discuss all options with the patient, but telling a patient that his decision is unwise is inappropriate.

PTS: 1 CON: Medication| Ethics| Legal

6.ANS:3

Objective: 13. Explain ways to make your nursing entries in the patient’s chart so that the chart would serve you well in a court of law.

15. Apply nursing ethics and laws to specific scenarios.

Page: 34-39

Heading: Law > Types of Laws

Integrated Processes: Communication and Documentation

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Safety and Infection Control

Cognitive Level: Application [Applying]

Concept: Communication: Legal: Safety

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 If the patient is able to give consent, it is not likely that there is a need for restraints.
2 Although family members may give their consent for restraints to be used in the event that a patient may cause injury to himself or herself, it is not required.
3 Unless the nurse documents that other methods have been tried and failed to protect the patient, and the physician has ordered them, restraints may not be used.
4 If a patient is alert and oriented, there is no need for restraints.

PTS: 1 CON: Communication| Legal| Safety

7.ANS:4

Objective: 14. Compare a proxy directive with an instructional directive.

Page: 43

Heading: Legal Documents > Advance Directives

Integrated Processes: Teaching and Learning

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Application [Applying]

Concept: Communication: Nursing Roles: Legal

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 Not all instructional directives require power of attorney.
2 A patient’s wishes are followed only when there is an advance directive and the patient has become incapacitated.
3 An instructional directive may or may not address DNR; a doctor’s order is required in any event.
4 An instructional directive has written guidelines explaining what type of care a patient wants and under what circumstances if a person is unable to make his or her own decisions.

PTS:1CON:Communication| Nursing Roles| Legal

8.ANS:3

Objective: Describe ways in which you could violate HIPAA regulations within a hospital or clinic setting.

Page: 34-39

Heading: Law > Types of Laws

Integrated Processes: Teaching and Learning

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Analysis [Analyzing]

Concept: Communication: Nursing Roles: Legal

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 The chart is the property of the hospital, and written permission is required for the chart to be copied.
2 With signed permission, the chart may be copied, most generally to a lawyer, another medical institution, or an insurance company.
3 With signed permission by the patient, a copy of most of the chart can be made.
4 HIPAA states that with signed permission, the chart can be copied.

PTS:1CON:Communication| Nursing Roles| Legal

9.ANS:2

Objective: 8. Read your state’s Nurse Practice Act in its entirety.

Page: 34-39

Heading: Law > Types of Laws

Integrated Processes: Teaching and Learning

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Application [Applying]

Concept: Nursing Roles: Regulations: Legal

Difficulty: Moderate

Feedback
1 The Patient’s Bill of Rights was adopted by the American Hospital Association but may or may not be included in an NPA.
2 An NPA writes and enforces rules and regulations dictating boundaries within which nurses must practice.
3 ANA guidelines enhance the standards of nursing care.
4 A state’s NPA may include the reasons that a nurse may have action taken against his or her license, but more importantly, it lays out and enforces the rules and regulations that dictate boundaries within which nurses must practice.

PTS: 1 CON: Nursing Roles| Regulations| Legal

10.ANS:3

Objective: 13. Explain ways to make your nursing entries in the patient’s chart so that the chart would serve you well in a court of law.

Page: 42

Heading: Legal Documents > Patient Chart

Integrated Processes: Communication and Documentation

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Application [Applying]

Concept: Communication

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 Telling or charting that a patient will take medications is inappropriate and constitutes assault.
2 Charting this statement indicates that the nurse forced or coerced the patient to take medications.
3 Only facts should be entered in a patient’s chart.
4 Charting that the patient is uncooperative is the nurse’s opinion and is not appropriate on a legal document.

PTS:1CON:Communication

11.ANS:3

Objective: 3. Explain what it means to advocate for a patient and why it is so very important.

Page: 33

Heading: Ethics > Patients’ Ethical Rights

Integrated Processes: Caring

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Application [Applying]

Concept: Nursing Roles

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 An ethics board explores what action to take in a dilemma.
2 A value system is each person’s belief of something’s worth.
3 The nurse’s role as an advocate is to respect and support a patient’s decision regarding treatment, regardless of the nurse’s personal feelings.
4 Conscience is a person’s sense of right and wrong. The nurse would be acting on his or her own conscience, not as the patient’s conscience.

PTS:1CON:Nursing Roles

12.ANS:4

Objective: 12. Identify at least five ways to keep your nursing practice up to date after graduating.

Page: 41-42

Heading: Professional Accountability > Continuing Education

Integrated Processes: Teaching and Learning

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Analysis [Analyzing]

Concept: Evidence-based Practice: Nursing Roles

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 Taking a cooking class will not enhance nursing knowledge.
2 Improving computer literacy may or may not enhance a nurse’s ability to provide patient care.
3 Although the history of nursing is important, it is not pertinent for enhancing nursing knowledge.
4 High standards of care can be maintained when a nurse uses nursing research or other medical research to improve care.

PTS:1CON:Evidence-based Practice| Nursing Roles

13.ANS:2

Objective: 3. Explain what it means to advocate for a patient and why it is so very important.

17. Discuss information found in the Connection features in this chapter.

Page: 33

Heading: Ethics > Patients’ Ethical Rights

Integrated Processes: Teaching and Learning

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Cognitive Level: Application [Applying]

Concept: Nursing Roles: Ethics

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 As a patient’s advocate, a nurse must stand with the patient, a nurse must stand for the patient, and a nurse must stand by the patient, always asserting himself or herself in the patient’s best interest.
2 Serving as the patient’s advocate requires that a nurse assist and provide care to the patient without imposing his or her own values on the patient.
3 As the patient’s advocate, a nurse will have opportunities to validate patients’ feelings, to provide physical care and comfort, and to help patients live and die with dignity.
4 As the patient’s advocate, a nurse must stand with the patient, a nurse must stand for the patient, and a nurse must stand by the patient, always asserting himself or herself in the patient’s best interest. Empathy is the ability to intellectually or emotionally understand the feelings of another person without actually experiencing or even agreeing with his or her situation, thoughts, feelings, distress, or pain.

PTS:1CON:Nursing Roles| Ethics

14.ANS:3

Objective: 4. Discuss Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders.

Page: 33-34

Heading: Ethics > Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders

Integrated Processes: Communication and Documentation

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Application [Applying]

Concept: Communication: Ethics

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 In certain situations when a patient is in the terminal stages of a disease and not expected to live much longer, the physician may write a DNR order in the patient’s chart. This generally indicates that the care for the patient should be limited to that which allows for comfort and dignity while withholding life-extending steps such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, tube feeding, or use of a ventilator to breathe for the patient.
2 In certain situations when a patient is in the terminal stages of a disease and not expected to live much longer, the physician may write a DNR order in the patient’s chart. This generally indicates that the care for the patient should be limited to that which allows for comfort and dignity while withholding life-extending steps such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, tube feeding, or use of a ventilator to breathe for the patient.
3 In certain situations when a patient is in the terminal stages of a disease and not expected to live much longer, the physician may write a DNR order in the patient’s chart. This generally indicates that the care for the patient should be limited to that which allows for comfort and dignity while withholding life-extending steps such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, tube feeding, or use of a ventilator to breathe for the patient.
4 In certain situations when a patient is in the terminal stages of a disease and not expected to live much longer, the physician may write a DNR order in the patient’s chart. This generally indicates that the care for the patient should be limited to that which allows for comfort and dignity while withholding life-extending steps such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, tube feeding, or use of a ventilator to breathe for the patient.

PTS: 1 CON: Communication| Ethics

15.ANS:2

Objective: 11. Discuss your responsibilities related to professional accountability.

Page: 40

Heading: Professional Accountability > Professional Role Boundaries

Integrated Processes: Teaching and Learning

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Application [Applying]

Concept: Nursing: Nursing Roles

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 A nurse’s relationships with his or her patients must be kept on a professional level. A nurse cannot allow personal feelings to affect his or her actions on the job and must take care to avoid emotional involvement with a patient.
2 It is paramount that a nurse remembers his or her number one role: The nurse is to serve as the patient’s advocate.
3 A nurse’s relationships with his or her patients must be kept on a professional level. A nurse cannot allow personal feelings to affect his or her actions on the job and must take care to avoid emotional involvement with a patient.
4 A nurse’s relationships with his or her patients must be kept on a professional level. A nurse cannot allow personal feelings to affect his or her actions on the job and must take care to avoid emotional involvement with a patient.

PTS: 1 CON: Nursing| Nursing Roles

16.ANS:4

Objective: 6. Describe ways in which you could violate HIPAA regulations within a hospital or clinic setting.

Page: 42

Heading: Legal Documents > Patient Chart

Integrated Processes: Teaching and Learning

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Analysis [Analyzing]

Concept: Nursing Roles: Communication: Health Care System: Legal

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 The chart does not belong to the patient, but is the property of the hospital or of the physician in a clinic setting. The patient has the right to access the chart and to request copies of the chart as guaranteed by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.
2 The chart is considered confidential and may only be accessed by health-care workers providing care to the patient.
3 The chart does not belong to the patient, but is the property of the hospital or of the physician in a clinic setting. The patient has the right to access the chart and to request copies of the chart as guaranteed by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA).
4 With signed permission from the patient, copies of the chart may be made available to the patient’s insurance company or other health-care agencies or physicians.

PTS: 1 CON: Nursing Roles| Communication| Health Care System| Legal

17.ANS:2

Objective: 16. Identify your school’s policy for handling your assigned patient’s confidential information that you use to prepare your care plans.

Page: 42

Heading: Legal Documents > Patient Chart

Integrated Processes: Communication and Documentation

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Application [Applying]

Concept: Communication: Ethics: Legal

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 Any data that the student collects from the chart must be written in a way that maintains confidentiality for the patient. In other words, the patient’s name and identifying numbers should never be written on any of the paperwork that will be taken outside the facility.
2 Any data that the student collects from the chart must be written in a way that maintains confidentiality for the patient.
3 Charts may not be copied for students to use in their care planning or written assignments.
4 In the United States, government hospitals forbid that any copy of any document in the patient chart be taken outside the hospital walls, even if the name is cut off the page. Notes that are written while caring for the patient, as well as copies of care plans or physician orders, should be transcribed to the patient chart as necessary and shredded before leaving the facility.

PTS: 1 CON: Communication| Ethics| Legal

18.ANS:3

Objective: 11. Discuss your responsibilities related to professional accountability.

Page: 43-45

Heading: Legal Documents > Incident Reports

Integrated Processes: Communication and Documentation

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Application [Applying]

Concept: Communication

Difficulty: Easy

Feedback
1 Incident reports, also known as unusual occurrence reports or variance reports, are to be completed in the event of an unusual occurrence or an accident.
2 When accidents or unusual occurrences happen, injuries, physical assessments, and care provided are documented in the chart, generally in the nurse’s notes. Entries are kept factual and objective, without impressions, assumptions, or conclusions. Then an incident report is completed according to agency policy, including notification of the supervisor and designated personnel.
3 The completion of an incident report is not mentioned in the patient’s chart. Nor will the report be filed as part of the chart; it will be filed separately.
4 The incident report should include what happened, who was involved, witnesses to the event, and treatment provided.

PTS:1CON:Communication

MULTIPLE RESPONSE

1.ANS:2, 5

Feedback
1. This is incorrect. Seeking assistance with patients does not constitute sexual harassment.
2. This is correct. Asking what someone else will do for you, particularly between male and female nurses, can create a sexual innuendo. This could result in complaints of sexual harassment.
3. This is incorrect. Stating a wish to make rounds with a physician does not constitute sexual harassment.
4. This is incorrect. Seeking assistance with patients does not constitute sexual harassment.
5. This is correct. The accusation that male nurses do not carry their weight targets one gender and can result in complaints of sexual harassment.

Objective: 10. Name five areas of tort law that apply to the nurse.

Page: 34-39

Heading: Law > Types of Laws

Integrated Processes: Communication and Documentation

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Safety and Infection Control

Cognitive Level: Analysis [Analyzing]

Concept: Nursing Roles: Regulations

Difficulty: Moderate

PTS: 1 CON: Nursing Roles| Regulations

2.ANS:2, 3, 5

Feedback
1. This is incorrect. Spousal abuse involves adults, and while the nurse should communicate this information to the physician, the nurse is not required to report it.
2. This is correct. A nurse is required to report cases of admitted and suspected abuse, such as when an elderly patient states that she is fearful of another person.
3. This is correct. A nurse is required to report cases of admitted and suspected abuse, such as when there are varying degrees in colors of bruising in a minor.
4. This is incorrect. An adolescent with a black eye in the absence of acknowledgment of abuse or any other injuries would not result in suspicion of abuse.
5. This is correct. A nurse is required to report cases of admitted and suspected abuse, such as when an elderly patient refuses to discuss a subject with the nurse because of her son’s response.

Objective: 9. Specify two areas of mandatory reporting for nurses.

15. Apply nursing ethics and laws to specific scenarios.

Page: 34-39

Heading: Law > Types of Laws

Integrated Processes: Communication and Documentation

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Safety and Infection Control

Cognitive Level: Analysis [Analyzing]

Concept: Nursing Roles: Regulations

Difficulty: Moderate

PTS: 1 CON: Nursing Roles| Regulations

COMPLETION

1.ANS:

sexual harassment

The three areas of tort law that directly affect nurses and their practice are assault and battery, false imprisonment, and sexual harassment.

Objective: 10. Name five areas of tort law that apply to the nurse.

Page: 34-39

Heading: Law > Types of Laws

Integrated Processes: Teaching and Learning

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Safety and Infection Control

Cognitive Level: Application [Applying]

Concept: Nursing Roles: Legal: Safety

Difficulty: Moderate

PTS: 1 CON: Nursing Roles| Legal| Safety

2.ANS:

empathy

A good nurse has empathy for patients and families, as well as coworkers. Empathy is the ability to intellectually or emotionally understand the feelings of another person without actually experiencing or even agreeing with the person’s situation, thoughts, feelings, distress, or pain. It is different from sympathy, which is sharing the feelings and distress of the other individual.

Objective: A. Define various terms associated with nursing ethics and law.

Page: 33

Heading: Ethics > Patients’ Ethical Rights

Integrated Processes: Caring

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Cognitive Level: Comprehension [Understanding]

Concept: Nursing Roles: Ethics

Difficulty: Easy

PTS:1CON:Nursing Roles| Ethics

3.ANS:

restraint

Before restraint devices can be used, the patient must present a clear danger to either himself or herself or others, and other methods of protecting the patient from injury must have been attempted. When other methods fail to provide adequate safety, the physician must write an order for the restraint device to be used.

Objective: 15. Apply nursing ethics and laws to specific scenarios.

Page: 34-39

Heading: Law > Types of Laws

Integrated Processes: Clinical Problem-Solving Process (Nursing Process)

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Safety and Infection Control

Cognitive Level: Comprehension [Understanding]

Concept: Ethics: Safety: Legal

Difficulty: Easy

PTS:1CON:Ethics| Safety| Legal

4.ANS:

mandatory reporting

One area of mandatory reporting is the abuse of children. All 50 states require that a nurse report to authorities even suspected child abuse, including physical, verbal, sexual, and emotional abuse, and abuse by neglect. Reports can be made to local law officials or directly to specific group services such as the state Child Protective Services (CPS).

Objective: 9. Specify two areas of mandatory reporting for nurses.

Page: 34-39

Heading: Law > Types of Laws

Integrated Processes: Communication and Documentation

Client Need: Psychosocial Integrity

Cognitive Level: Comprehension [Understanding]

Concept: Violence: Communication: Legal

Difficulty: Easy

PTS: 1 CON: Violence| Communication| Legal

5.ANS:

Nurse Practice Act

As a nurse or as a student, discussion of patients on social media, even if the patients are unnamed, should be avoided. Patient confidentiality must be protected at all times and in all situations, not just at the place of employment. Action can be taken on a nurse’s license when the use of social networking is such that it violates the state’s Nurse Practice Act and Rules.

Objective: 8. Read your state’s Nurse Practice Act in its entirety.

18. Identify specific safety issues.

Page: 34-39

Heading: Law > Types of Laws

Integrated Processes: Communication and Documentation

Client Need: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Coordinated Care

Cognitive Level: Comprehension [Understanding]

Concept: Nursing: Regulations: Informatics: Legal

Difficulty: Moderate

PTS:1CON:Nursing| Regulations| Informatics| Legal

fundamentals of nursing care 2nd edition burton test bank

Table of Contents

I. Introduction to Nursing

1. The Vista of Nursing

2. Health Care Delivery and Economics

3. Nursing Ethics and Law

4. The Nursing Process and Decision Making

5. Documentation

II. Communicating and Understanding

6. Communication and Relationships

7. Promoting Health and Wellness

8. Ethnic, Cultural, and Spiritual Aspects of Care

9. Growth and Development throughout the Lifespan

10. Loss, Grief, and Dying

11. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

III. Nursing Basics

12. Patient Teaching

13. Safety

14. Medical Asepsis and Infection Control

15. Personal Care

16. Moving and Positioning Patients

17. Vital Signs

18. Applying Heat and Cold

19. Pain Management, Rest, and Restorative Sleep

20. Admission, Transfer, and Discharge

21. Physical Assessment

22. Surgical Asepsis

IV. Clinical Skills and Care

23. Nutrition

24. Nutritional Care and Support

25. Diagnostic Tests

26. Wound Care

27. Musculoskeletal Care

28. Respiratory Care

29. Fluids, Electrolytes, and Acid-Base Balance

30. Bowel Elimination and Care

31. Urinary Elimination and Care

32. Care of Elderly Patients

33. Care of the Surgical Patient

34. Phlebotomy and Blood Specimens

V. Medical Administration

35. Research and Preparing Medications

36. Administering Oral, Topical, and Mucosal Medications

37. Administering Intradermal, Subcutaneous, and Intramuscular Injections

38. Peripheral IV Therapy